Architecture

The beautiful architecture of Detroit’s most stunning places of worship

the-beautiful-architecture-of-detroits-most-stunning-places-of-worship

Sweetest Heart of Mary Church

4440 Russell St., Detroit

The religious history of Detroit’s Polish community is complex and remains hotly disputed. In 1885, the parish of St. Albertus was polarized into two factions. Ultimately, a Father Dominic Hippolytus Kolasiñski was excommunicated. When he left in 1886 for the Dakota Territory, his followers in Detroit founded their own institutions parallel to that of the St. Albertus mainstream. What began as a religious school for the community’s children, soon became the Sweetest Heart of Mary Parish, operating without authorization from the Catholic Church of Detroit. Over the past century, the church did in fact fall into line with the Catholic Church authorities and has since bloomed into one of the most architecturally stunning churches in the city.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Sweetest Heart of Mary Church

4440 Russell St., Detroit

The religious history of Detroit’s Polish community is complex and remains hotly disputed. In 1885, the parish of St. Albertus was polarized into two factions. Ultimately, a Father Dominic Hippolytus Kolasiñski was excommunicated. When he left in 1886 for the Dakota Territory, his followers in Detroit founded their own institutions parallel to that of the St. Albertus mainstream. What began as a religious school for the community’s children, soon became the Sweetest Heart of Mary Parish, operating without authorization from the Catholic Church of Detroit. Over the past century, the church did in fact fall into line with the Catholic Church authorities and has since bloomed into one of the most architecturally stunning churches in the city.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Sweetest Heart of Mary Church

4440 Russell St., Detroit

The religious history of Detroit’s Polish community is complex and remains hotly disputed. In 1885, the parish of St. Albertus was polarized into two factions. Ultimately, a Father Dominic Hippolytus Kolasiñski was excommunicated. When he left in 1886 for the Dakota Territory, his followers in Detroit founded their own institutions parallel to that of the St. Albertus mainstream. What began as a religious school for the community’s children, soon became the Sweetest Heart of Mary Parish, operating without authorization from the Catholic Church of Detroit. Over the past century, the church did in fact fall into line with the Catholic Church authorities and has since bloomed into one of the most architecturally stunning churches in the city.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Sweetest Heart of Mary Church

4440 Russell St., Detroit

The religious history of Detroit’s Polish community is complex and remains hotly disputed. In 1885, the parish of St. Albertus was polarized into two factions. Ultimately, a Father Dominic Hippolytus Kolasiñski was excommunicated. When he left in 1886 for the Dakota Territory, his followers in Detroit founded their own institutions parallel to that of the St. Albertus mainstream. What began as a religious school for the community’s children, soon became the Sweetest Heart of Mary Parish, operating without authorization from the Catholic Church of Detroit. Over the past century, the church did in fact fall into line with the Catholic Church authorities and has since bloomed into one of the most architecturally stunning churches in the city.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Sweetest Heart of Mary Church

4440 Russell St., Detroit

The religious history of Detroit’s Polish community is complex and remains hotly disputed. In 1885, the parish of St. Albertus was polarized into two factions. Ultimately, a Father Dominic Hippolytus Kolasiñski was excommunicated. When he left in 1886 for the Dakota Territory, his followers in Detroit founded their own institutions parallel to that of the St. Albertus mainstream. What began as a religious school for the community’s children, soon became the Sweetest Heart of Mary Parish, operating without authorization from the Catholic Church of Detroit. Over the past century, the church did in fact fall into line with the Catholic Church authorities and has since bloomed into one of the most architecturally stunning churches in the city.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament

9844 Woodward Ave., Detroit

Established in 1905 in what was then known as Detroit’s Piety Hill area, the Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament is one of Michigan’s central religious institutions. In 1937, when Detroit was elevated to archdiocese status with the Vatican, the Most Blessed Sacrament was selected to house the archdiocese, which it still does today. In 1987, when Pope John Paul II visited the US, he spoke before a crowd at the cathedral and spent the night at the adjacent archbishop’s residence. It remains a key institution of the politico-religious system of Detroit.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament

9844 Woodward Ave., Detroit

Established in 1905 in what was then known as Detroit’s Piety Hill area, the Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament is one of Michigan’s central religious institutions. In 1937, when Detroit was elevated to archdiocese status with the Vatican, the Most Blessed Sacrament was selected to house the archdiocese, which it still does today. In 1987, when Pope John Paul II visited the US, he spoke before a crowd at the cathedral and spent the night at the adjacent archbishop’s residence. It remains a key institution of the politico-religious system of Detroit.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament

9844 Woodward Ave., Detroit

Established in 1905 in what was then known as Detroit’s Piety Hill area, the Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament is one of Michigan’s central religious institutions. In 1937, when Detroit was elevated to archdiocese status with the Vatican, the Most Blessed Sacrament was selected to house the archdiocese, which it still does today. In 1987, when Pope John Paul II visited the US, he spoke before a crowd at the cathedral and spent the night at the adjacent archbishop’s residence. It remains a key institution of the politico-religious system of Detroit.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Bethel AME

5050 St. Antoine St., Detroit

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. famously said the most segregated hour of the week in America was Sunday morning. Growing naturally out of American segregation, the African Methodist Episcopal Church movement was founded by a group of former slaves and free black men in 1816. In 1839, the movement reached Detroit when fifty black Detroiters came together to form the Colored Methodist Society, which two years later would join the AME denomination.

As is often the case with black churches in Detroit, Bethel AME has changed location a number of times, often due to so-called urban renewal. In 1974, the church found its current home, three and a half acres on Warren Boulevard. Since its founding, Bethel AME has served not only as the site of religious congregation for its community, but also as a school for black children, a point of assistance for black southern immigrants to Detroit, and has advocated for fair housing and labor policies.
Photos by Will Feuer
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Bethel AME

5050 St. Antoine St., Detroit

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. famously said the most segregated hour of the week in America was Sunday morning. Growing naturally out of American segregation, the African Methodist Episcopal Church movement was founded by a group of former slaves and free black men in 1816. In 1839, the movement reached Detroit when fifty black Detroiters came together to form the Colored Methodist Society, which two years later would join the AME denomination.

As is often the case with black churches in Detroit, Bethel AME has changed location a number of times, often due to so-called urban renewal. In 1974, the church found its current home, three and a half acres on Warren Boulevard. Since its founding, Bethel AME has served not only as the site of religious congregation for its community, but also as a school for black children, a point of assistance for black southern immigrants to Detroit, and has advocated for fair housing and labor policies.
Photos by Will Feuer
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Bethel AME

5050 St. Antoine St., Detroit

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. famously said the most segregated hour of the week in America was Sunday morning. Growing naturally out of American segregation, the African Methodist Episcopal Church movement was founded by a group of former slaves and free black men in 1816. In 1839, the movement reached Detroit when fifty black Detroiters came together to form the Colored Methodist Society, which two years later would join the AME denomination.

As is often the case with black churches in Detroit, Bethel AME has changed location a number of times, often due to so-called urban renewal. In 1974, the church found its current home, three and a half acres on Warren Boulevard. Since its founding, Bethel AME has served not only as the site of religious congregation for its community, but also as a school for black children, a point of assistance for black southern immigrants to Detroit, and has advocated for fair housing and labor policies.
Photos by Will Feuer
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St. Bonaventure Monastery (Franciscan Capuchins)

1740 Mt. Elliott Ave., Detroit

Detroit may seem an unlikely location for a Capuchin monastery, but since 1883, St. Bonaventure has been a fixture of lower East Detroit. The Monastery has been a welcome anchor of stability in a rapidly changing neighborhood. Today, the monastery is in good company, surrounded by the Gleaners Community Food Bank, the nationally acclaimed nonprofit Downtown Boxing Gym Youth Program, and the curious Seafoam Palace of Arts and Amusements.

From just across the tranquil Mt. Elliott Cemetery, on the street of the same name, the white-tipped spire of St. Bonaventure hovers over the rest of the neighborhood. Inside, one can peruse their dozen bronze statues of leaders who have shaped the fabric of the city or stroll through their eloquent reflection garden. Also inside is the interred body of Solanus Casey, who served at the Detroit convent from 1924 to 1945. In 1995, Pope John Paul II declared that Casey had lived a life of heroic virtue and titled him Venerable. His body is now the subject of religious pilgrimages for Roman Catholic visitors around the world.
Photos by Will Feuer
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St. Bonaventure Monastery (Franciscan Capuchins)

1740 Mt. Elliott Ave., Detroit

Detroit may seem an unlikely location for a Capuchin monastery, but since 1883, St. Bonaventure has been a fixture of lower East Detroit. The Monastery has been a welcome anchor of stability in a rapidly changing neighborhood. Today, the monastery is in good company, surrounded by the Gleaners Community Food Bank, the nationally acclaimed nonprofit Downtown Boxing Gym Youth Program, and the curious Seafoam Palace of Arts and Amusements.

From just across the tranquil Mt. Elliott Cemetery, on the street of the same name, the white-tipped spire of St. Bonaventure hovers over the rest of the neighborhood. Inside, one can peruse their dozen bronze statues of leaders who have shaped the fabric of the city or stroll through their eloquent reflection garden. Also inside is the interred body of Solanus Casey, who served at the Detroit convent from 1924 to 1945. In 1995, Pope John Paul II declared that Casey had lived a life of heroic virtue and titled him Venerable. His body is now the subject of religious pilgrimages for Roman Catholic visitors around the world.
Photos by Will Feuer
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St. Bonaventure Monastery (Franciscan Capuchins)

1740 Mt. Elliott Ave., Detroit

Detroit may seem an unlikely location for a Capuchin monastery, but since 1883, St. Bonaventure has been a fixture of lower East Detroit. The Monastery has been a welcome anchor of stability in a rapidly changing neighborhood. Today, the monastery is in good company, surrounded by the Gleaners Community Food Bank, the nationally acclaimed nonprofit Downtown Boxing Gym Youth Program, and the curious Seafoam Palace of Arts and Amusements.

From just across the tranquil Mt. Elliott Cemetery, on the street of the same name, the white-tipped spire of St. Bonaventure hovers over the rest of the neighborhood. Inside, one can peruse their dozen bronze statues of leaders who have shaped the fabric of the city or stroll through their eloquent reflection garden. Also inside is the interred body of Solanus Casey, who served at the Detroit convent from 1924 to 1945. In 1995, Pope John Paul II declared that Casey had lived a life of heroic virtue and titled him Venerable. His body is now the subject of religious pilgrimages for Roman Catholic visitors around the world.
Photos by Will Feuer
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Christ Church Detroit

960 E Jefferson Ave., Detroit

The oldest, continuously used Protestant religious site in the city of Detroit, Christ Church Detroit was founded in 1845 due to overcrowding at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul when the city had a population of just 13,000. At the turn of the 19th century, the Church canvassed their neighborhood along Woodbridge St. in search of new members and discovered a sizeable population of Syrian immigrants. The church welcomed this community and in 1914 baptized the first Syrians in their congregation, which became a defining moment in the Church’s history. Today, they are committed allies to the Syrian community of Detroit, and in 2016, along with an Episcopal parish and a Jewish congregation, they sponsored a Syrian refugee family.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Christ Church Detroit

960 E Jefferson Ave., Detroit

The oldest, continuously used Protestant religious site in the city of Detroit, Christ Church Detroit was founded in 1845 due to overcrowding at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul when the city had a population of just 13,000. At the turn of the 19th century, the Church canvassed their neighborhood along Woodbridge St. in search of new members and discovered a sizeable population of Syrian immigrants. The church welcomed this community and in 1914 baptized the first Syrians in their congregation, which became a defining moment in the Church’s history. Today, they are committed allies to the Syrian community of Detroit, and in 2016, along with an Episcopal parish and a Jewish congregation, they sponsored a Syrian refugee family.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Christ Church Detroit

960 E Jefferson Ave., Detroit

The oldest, continuously used Protestant religious site in the city of Detroit, Christ Church Detroit was founded in 1845 due to overcrowding at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul when the city had a population of just 13,000. At the turn of the 19th century, the Church canvassed their neighborhood along Woodbridge St. in search of new members and discovered a sizeable population of Syrian immigrants. The church welcomed this community and in 1914 baptized the first Syrians in their congregation, which became a defining moment in the Church’s history. Today, they are committed allies to the Syrian community of Detroit, and in 2016, along with an Episcopal parish and a Jewish congregation, they sponsored a Syrian refugee family.

Photos by Will Feuer
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First Congregational Church of Detroit

33 East Forest Ave., Detroit

The current location of the First Congregational Church was built in 1891. Unlike the plain meeting houses typically found in New England Congregational Churches, the Detroit counterpart went for a more grand design. The Romanesque and Byzantine architecture is directly drawn from sanctuaries found in Italy’s Venice and Ravenna. When the church was housed in its prior building at Fort and Wayne Streets, the church was a well-known stop on the Underground Railroad, which provided a route for black slaves to escape to Canada. In 2001, the church decided to memorialize this part of their history with an in-house museum. In an effort to preserve the church and building, preservationists have launched an extensive project to restore the structure.

Photos by Will Feuer
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First Congregational Church of Detroit

33 East Forest Ave., Detroit

The current location of the First Congregational Church was built in 1891. Unlike the plain meeting houses typically found in New England Congregational Churches, the Detroit counterpart went for a more grand design. The Romanesque and Byzantine architecture is directly drawn from sanctuaries found in Italy’s Venice and Ravenna. When the church was housed in its prior building at Fort and Wayne Streets, the church was a well-known stop on the Underground Railroad, which provided a route for black slaves to escape to Canada. In 2001, the church decided to memorialize this part of their history with an in-house museum. In an effort to preserve the church and building, preservationists have launched an extensive project to restore the structure.

Photos by Will Feuer
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First Congregational Church of Detroit

33 East Forest Ave., Detroit

The current location of the First Congregational Church was built in 1891. Unlike the plain meeting houses typically found in New England Congregational Churches, the Detroit counterpart went for a more grand design. The Romanesque and Byzantine architecture is directly drawn from sanctuaries found in Italy’s Venice and Ravenna. When the church was housed in its prior building at Fort and Wayne Streets, the church was a well-known stop on the Underground Railroad, which provided a route for black slaves to escape to Canada. In 2001, the church decided to memorialize this part of their history with an in-house museum. In an effort to preserve the church and building, preservationists have launched an extensive project to restore the structure.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Bethel Community Transformation Center

8801 Woodward Ave., Detroit

Designed by legendary Detroit architect Albert Kahn, The Bethel Community Transformation Center was formerly one of many synagogues throughout the city. After Temple Beth El moved to Bloomfield Hills in 1973, the historic building changed hands between several churches. Over time, however, operating and maintenance costs proved too much for owners and the building fell into disrepair. In 2014, the building was purchased by Pastor Aramis Hinds of Breakers Covenant Church International. Now, a diverse group of Jews, Christians, whites and blacks have a vision to renovate the building into a community center with a performing arts theater, fitness center and co-working space. The building will also be open as a place of worship to members of all faiths.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Bethel Community Transformation Center

8801 Woodward Ave., Detroit

Designed by legendary Detroit architect Albert Kahn, The Bethel Community Transformation Center was formerly one of many synagogues throughout the city. After Temple Beth El moved to Bloomfield Hills in 1973, the historic building changed hands between several churches. Over time, however, operating and maintenance costs proved too much for owners and the building fell into disrepair. In 2014, the building was purchased by Pastor Aramis Hinds of Breakers Covenant Church International. Now, a diverse group of Jews, Christians, whites and blacks have a vision to renovate the building into a community center with a performing arts theater, fitness center and co-working space. The building will also be open as a place of worship to members of all faiths.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Bethel Community Transformation Center

8801 Woodward Ave., Detroit

Designed by legendary Detroit architect Albert Kahn, The Bethel Community Transformation Center was formerly one of many synagogues throughout the city. After Temple Beth El moved to Bloomfield Hills in 1973, the historic building changed hands between several churches. Over time, however, operating and maintenance costs proved too much for owners and the building fell into disrepair. In 2014, the building was purchased by Pastor Aramis Hinds of Breakers Covenant Church International. Now, a diverse group of Jews, Christians, whites and blacks have a vision to renovate the building into a community center with a performing arts theater, fitness center and co-working space. The building will also be open as a place of worship to members of all faiths.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Plymouth United Church of Christ

600 E Warren Ave, Detroit

On May 4, 1919, nine black Detroiters met inside a home at 620 Melbourne Street to found the first black Congregational church in Michigan, later to become Plymouth Congregational Church. As is common among black churches in Detroit, Plymouth changed locations often due to discriminatory zoning laws and development projects. In 1972, forced to vacate their former location due to the construction of the Medical Center, Plymouth broke ground on their current location at 600 East Warren Avenue. The Church is proud of its long history of members involved in the city’s civic life, from the Detroit Housing Commission to the Detroit City Council.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Plymouth United Church of Christ

600 E Warren Ave, Detroit

On May 4, 1919, nine black Detroiters met inside a home at 620 Melbourne Street to found the first black Congregational church in Michigan, later to become Plymouth Congregational Church. As is common among black churches in Detroit, Plymouth changed locations often due to discriminatory zoning laws and development projects. In 1972, forced to vacate their former location due to the construction of the Medical Center, Plymouth broke ground on their current location at 600 East Warren Avenue. The Church is proud of its long history of members involved in the city’s civic life, from the Detroit Housing Commission to the Detroit City Council.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Plymouth United Church of Christ

600 E Warren Ave, Detroit

On May 4, 1919, nine black Detroiters met inside a home at 620 Melbourne Street to found the first black Congregational church in Michigan, later to become Plymouth Congregational Church. As is common among black churches in Detroit, Plymouth changed locations often due to discriminatory zoning laws and development projects. In 1972, forced to vacate their former location due to the construction of the Medical Center, Plymouth broke ground on their current location at 600 East Warren Avenue. The Church is proud of its long history of members involved in the city’s civic life, from the Detroit Housing Commission to the Detroit City Council.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Mariner’s Church of Detroit

170 E Jefferson Ave., Detroit

Constructed in 1849, the Mariner’s Church of Detroit watches over the Detroit River in protection of Detroit’s sailors who were often treated as pariahs in traditional society. In 1955, plans for a new civic center on the former site of the church called for its demolition, but instead the 3000-ton building was moved 880 feet east to its current location. At this time, a secret underground tunnel revealed its role as a stop along the Underground Railroad. The various acclaimed stained glass windows in the church depict sailors and symbols of the Great Lakes.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Mariner’s Church of Detroit

170 E Jefferson Ave., Detroit

Constructed in 1849, the Mariner’s Church of Detroit watches over the Detroit River in protection of Detroit’s sailors who were often treated as pariahs in traditional society. In 1955, plans for a new civic center on the former site of the church called for its demolition, but instead the 3000-ton building was moved 880 feet east to its current location. At this time, a secret underground tunnel revealed its role as a stop along the Underground Railroad. The various acclaimed stained glass windows in the church depict sailors and symbols of the Great Lakes.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Mariner’s Church of Detroit

170 E Jefferson Ave., Detroit

Constructed in 1849, the Mariner’s Church of Detroit watches over the Detroit River in protection of Detroit’s sailors who were often treated as pariahs in traditional society. In 1955, plans for a new civic center on the former site of the church called for its demolition, but instead the 3000-ton building was moved 880 feet east to its current location. At this time, a secret underground tunnel revealed its role as a stop along the Underground Railroad. The various acclaimed stained glass windows in the church depict sailors and symbols of the Great Lakes.

Photos by Will Feuer
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St. Gabriel’s Roman Catholic Church

8118 West Vernor Hwy., Detroit

Little is known today about the now Spanish-speaking Detroit parish’s 100 years of history of in Southwest Detroit. Nonetheless, as the area’s Hispanic population continued to rise due to immigration to the city, the church remains a cornerstone of the community. In 2017, when All Saints Parish of Southwest closed, St. Gabriel’s was able to absorb much of All Saints’ artifacts and congregation.

Photos by Will Feuer
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St. Gabriel’s Roman Catholic Church

8118 West Vernor Hwy., Detroit

Little is known today about the now Spanish-speaking Detroit parish’s 100 years of history of in Southwest Detroit. Nonetheless, as the area’s Hispanic population continued to rise due to immigration to the city, the church remains a cornerstone of the community. In 2017, when All Saints Parish of Southwest closed, St. Gabriel’s was able to absorb much of All Saints’ artifacts and congregation.

Photos by Will Feuer
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St. Gabriel’s Roman Catholic Church

8118 West Vernor Hwy., Detroit

Little is known today about the now Spanish-speaking Detroit parish’s 100 years of history of in Southwest Detroit. Nonetheless, as the area’s Hispanic population continued to rise due to immigration to the city, the church remains a cornerstone of the community. In 2017, when All Saints Parish of Southwest closed, St. Gabriel’s was able to absorb much of All Saints’ artifacts and congregation.

Photos by Will Feuer
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St. Josaphat Church

715 East Canfield St., Detroit

In 1872, Detroit’s Polish population began to boom, leading to the establishment of St. Albertus, the first Polish-Catholic parish in Detroit. Growing out of St. Albertus in 1889, St. Josaphat was founded as a combination church, convent, and elementary school. Over the next century, St. Josaphat continued to grow as Detroit’s industry expanded, as did the wallets of the Polish population and thus that of their churches. Today, St. Josaphat boasts many jewels including a Sacred Heart rose window and the High Altar Holy Tabernacle. In 2013, due to financial woes, St. Josaphat merged with its neighbor, the impressive Sweetest Heart of Mary Church.

Photos by Will Feuer
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St. Josaphat Church

715 East Canfield St., Detroit

In 1872, Detroit’s Polish population began to boom, leading to the establishment of St. Albertus, the first Polish-Catholic parish in Detroit. Growing out of St. Albertus in 1889, St. Josaphat was founded as a combination church, convent, and elementary school. Over the next century, St. Josaphat continued to grow as Detroit’s industry expanded, as did the wallets of the Polish population and thus that of their churches. Today, St. Josaphat boasts many jewels including a Sacred Heart rose window and the High Altar Holy Tabernacle. In 2013, due to financial woes, St. Josaphat merged with its neighbor, the impressive Sweetest Heart of Mary Church.

Photos by Will Feuer
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St. Josaphat Church

715 East Canfield St., Detroit

In 1872, Detroit’s Polish population began to boom, leading to the establishment of St. Albertus, the first Polish-Catholic parish in Detroit. Growing out of St. Albertus in 1889, St. Josaphat was founded as a combination church, convent, and elementary school. Over the next century, St. Josaphat continued to grow as Detroit’s industry expanded, as did the wallets of the Polish population and thus that of their churches. Today, St. Josaphat boasts many jewels including a Sacred Heart rose window and the High Altar Holy Tabernacle. In 2013, due to financial woes, St. Josaphat merged with its neighbor, the impressive Sweetest Heart of Mary Church.

Photos by Will Feuer
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St. Joseph Oratory

1828 Jay St., Detroit

Built in 1855, St. Joseph Oratory is among the most prized historical possessions of the city. Just outside downtown, in the Eastern Market–Lafayette Park neighborhood, St. Joseph was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. The building is renowned for the intricacies of its stained glass, found on nearly all walls of the building, flooding the main chamber with natural light. It is currently undergoing extensive renovations.

Photos by Will Feuer
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St. Joseph Oratory

1828 Jay St., Detroit

Built in 1855, St. Joseph Oratory is among the most prized historical possessions of the city. Just outside downtown, in the Eastern Market–Lafayette Park neighborhood, St. Joseph was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. The building is renowned for the intricacies of its stained glass, found on nearly all walls of the building, flooding the main chamber with natural light. It is currently undergoing extensive renovations.

Photos by Will Feuer
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St. Joseph Oratory

1828 Jay St., Detroit

Built in 1855, St. Joseph Oratory is among the most prized historical possessions of the city. Just outside downtown, in the Eastern Market–Lafayette Park neighborhood, St. Joseph was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. The building is renowned for the intricacies of its stained glass, found on nearly all walls of the building, flooding the main chamber with natural light. It is currently undergoing extensive renovations.

Photos by Will Feuer
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St. Mary’s Catholic Church

646 Monroe St., Detroit

Completed in 1885, St. Mary’s Catholic Church is one of the oldest buildings remaining in Greektown today. The vastness of the church’s interior is striking as are many of the characteristics that make the building unique. It’s polished granite columns, originally intended for the New York State Capitol Building, separate the three aisles of pews. The church contains three grottos that emulate artificial caves to be used as altars depicting Christ’s agony, Christ’s baptism and the Lourdes Grotto.

Photos by Will Feuer
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St. Mary’s Catholic Church

646 Monroe St., Detroit

Completed in 1885, St. Mary’s Catholic Church is one of the oldest buildings remaining in Greektown today. The vastness of the church’s interior is striking as are many of the characteristics that make the building unique. It’s polished granite columns, originally intended for the New York State Capitol Building, separate the three aisles of pews. The church contains three grottos that emulate artificial caves to be used as altars depicting Christ’s agony, Christ’s baptism and the Lourdes Grotto.

Photos by Will Feuer
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St. Mary’s Catholic Church

646 Monroe St., Detroit

Completed in 1885, St. Mary’s Catholic Church is one of the oldest buildings remaining in Greektown today. The vastness of the church’s interior is striking as are many of the characteristics that make the building unique. It’s polished granite columns, originally intended for the New York State Capitol Building, separate the three aisles of pews. The church contains three grottos that emulate artificial caves to be used as altars depicting Christ’s agony, Christ’s baptism and the Lourdes Grotto.

Photos by Will Feuer
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Ste. Anne Parish de Detroit

1000 Ste. Anne St., Detroit

As for the first Catholic parish established in Detroit and the second Catholic parish established in the United States? That accolade goes to Ste. Anne Parish de Detroit, which traces its origins back to French colonist Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac who founded Detroit. Amid violent tensions between Native Americans and the French settlers, the original log cabin that housed the parish was burned down. Today, however, it sits amid the diverse Richard-Hubbard neighborhood near Michigan Central Station. Last year, the Archbishop asked the Pope to name Ste, Anne’s the first and only basilica in Detroit, and one of only three basilicas in Michigan. The decision has not yet been made.

Photos by Melanie Reyes
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Ste. Anne Parish de Detroit

1000 Ste. Anne St., Detroit

As for the first Catholic parish established in Detroit and the second Catholic parish established in the United States? That accolade goes to Ste. Anne Parish de Detroit, which traces its origins back to French colonist Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac who founded Detroit. Amid violent tensions between Native Americans and the French settlers, the original log cabin that housed the parish was burned down. Today, however, it sits amid the diverse Richard-Hubbard neighborhood near Michigan Central Station. Last year, the Archbishop asked the Pope to name Ste, Anne’s the first and only basilica in Detroit, and one of only three basilicas in Michigan. The decision has not yet been made.

Photos by Melanie Reyes
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Ste. Anne Parish de Detroit

1000 Ste. Anne St., Detroit

As for the first Catholic parish established in Detroit and the second Catholic parish established in the United States? That accolade goes to Ste. Anne Parish de Detroit, which traces its origins back to French colonist Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac who founded Detroit. Amid violent tensions between Native Americans and the French settlers, the original log cabin that housed the parish was burned down. Today, however, it sits amid the diverse Richard-Hubbard neighborhood near Michigan Central Station. Last year, the Archbishop asked the Pope to name Ste, Anne’s the first and only basilica in Detroit, and one of only three basilicas in Michigan. The decision has not yet been made.

Photos by Melanie Reyes
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Bhaktivedanta Cultural Center at the Lawrence Fisher Mansion

383 Lenox St., Detroit

The Fisher Mansion is, unto itself, a microcosm of the Detroit story. The mansion was built in the 1920s to flaunt the wealth of Lawrence Fisher, a prosperous beneficiary of the family business, which supplied parts to General Motors. Meant to emulate the Mediterranean style of Italian villas, the 22,000 square-foot home is surrounded by four acres of gardens. In its prime, it included such features as an indoor pool with a tunnel entrance, a mercury-treated fountain that allegedly made wine glow at parties (and also poisoned guests), and a personal canal that allowed Lawrence Fisher to illegally import booze during prohibition from Canada, which is easily seen from the property.

After decades of decline, the home was purchased in 1975 by Alfred Brush Ford, the great-grandson of the Ford patriarch, who subsequently donated it to The International Society for Krishna Consciousness, more commonly known as the Hare Krishna movement. Today, the group operates the mansion as a house of worship, cultural center and often offers guided tours of the mansion.
Photos by Will Feuer
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Bhaktivedanta Cultural Center at the Lawrence Fisher Mansion

383 Lenox St., Detroit

The Fisher Mansion is, unto itself, a microcosm of the Detroit story. The mansion was built in the 1920s to flaunt the wealth of Lawrence Fisher, a prosperous beneficiary of the family business, which supplied parts to General Motors. Meant to emulate the Mediterranean style of Italian villas, the 22,000 square-foot home is surrounded by four acres of gardens. In its prime, it included such features as an indoor pool with a tunnel entrance, a mercury-treated fountain that allegedly made wine glow at parties (and also poisoned guests), and a personal canal that allowed Lawrence Fisher to illegally import booze during prohibition from Canada, which is easily seen from the property.

After decades of decline, the home was purchased in 1975 by Alfred Brush Ford, the great-grandson of the Ford patriarch, who subsequently donated it to The International Society for Krishna Consciousness, more commonly known as the Hare Krishna movement. Today, the group operates the mansion as a house of worship, cultural center and often offers guided tours of the mansion.
Photos by Will Feuer
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Bhaktivedanta Cultural Center at the Lawrence Fisher Mansion

383 Lenox St., Detroit

The Fisher Mansion is, unto itself, a microcosm of the Detroit story. The mansion was built in the 1920s to flaunt the wealth of Lawrence Fisher, a prosperous beneficiary of the family business, which supplied parts to General Motors. Meant to emulate the Mediterranean style of Italian villas, the 22,000 square-foot home is surrounded by four acres of gardens. In its prime, it included such features as an indoor pool with a tunnel entrance, a mercury-treated fountain that allegedly made wine glow at parties (and also poisoned guests), and a personal canal that allowed Lawrence Fisher to illegally import booze during prohibition from Canada, which is easily seen from the property.

After decades of decline, the home was purchased in 1975 by Alfred Brush Ford, the great-grandson of the Ford patriarch, who subsequently donated it to The International Society for Krishna Consciousness, more commonly known as the Hare Krishna movement. Today, the group operates the mansion as a house of worship, cultural center and often offers guided tours of the mansion.
Photos by Will Feuer
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Dusty Kennedy